Pioneering Sports Writer Sam Lacy of the Baltimore Afro-American Newspaper

Pioneering Sports Writer Sam Lacy of the Baltimore Afro-American Newspaper

Like most films depicting historic accounts of real-life events, the bio-epic “42” carries the immediate disclaimer that it is based on a true story, leaving room for interpretive analysis and creative license. Consequently, dramatic interpretations are by their nature subject to scrutiny and debate.

While the film sticks close to the well-chronicled historic record regarding Jackie Robinson’s unique place in time as the first African American to play in the major leagues, its sins are mostly of omission. Focusing tightly on the milestone season of 1947, the movie hurries through the arduous process by which Robinson and other African American players who followed him got to the big leagues. No recognition for Robinson’s breakthrough given to anyone other than Brooklyn Dodgers owner Branch Rickey.

Of great influence in lobbying for the integration of major league baseball was the battle waged by members of the black press, among them Sam Lacy, who began his professional career as a sports writer for the Washington Tribune in 1926, moving on to become assistant national editor for the Chicago Defender and later the long-time sports editor and columnist for the Baltimore Afro-American.

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Sam Lacy received the National Baseball Hall of Fame's JG Spink Award in 1997.

Sam Lacy received the National Baseball Hall of Fame’s JG Spink Award in 1997.